Hit Refresh: The Quest to Rediscover Microsoft's Soul and Imagine a Better Future for Everyone by Satya Nadella

Megalomania and leadership does not go together. To be leader, today, what one needs is vision, clarity and empathy. Satya Nadella’s Hit Refresh, definitely hits you with interesting concepts of leadership, management and personal growth.


Satya Nadella took over as the CEO of the mega Microsoft in February 2014, and we celebrated, as a nation and as people who like to celebrate academic and corporate success of a fellow countryman. But what he had in front of his was a task not cut out for everyone. To take an organisation reeling under years of rigid culture and fighting out tough competition, at the same time innovating and growing to sustain the vision that was crafted in the beginning.

With Hit Refresh, Nadella, tells his story, personal and professional. His background as a young student in India, his love for cricket and how the sport helped him in his life, off the pitch and on it. As with most young Indians of our generation, his story resonates with success stories of those immigrating to the land of opportunities, his struggles and finally his success. On a personal front, Nadella put across how empathy has played an important role in his life and that was a big take away from Hit Refresh.

Hit Refresh is divided into nine chapters and each one can be an individual read. Loaded with industry insights and strategy solutions, each chapter helps to understand what thought goes behind partnering with competitors, buying out companies and basically being and making news. The chapters focus on Employees, Partners, Products and Culture. Nadella also unabashedly talks about some of the mistakes he has made while trying to take Microsoft to the top and that gives the book a personal touch. Written mainly as a first person account, Nadella talks to you, while dishing out some excellent management and leadership advice. Hit Refresh has some interesting anecdotes about how Microsoft came to be what it is today. Bill Gates’s foreword sets the stage for what is to come and that’s says a lot about the author.

The management and leadership concepts discussed are modern and a must read for the young, inexperienced students and the well experienced professionals alike. They bring to light how our organisations are sentient and connect with emotional make up of its people.
Culture does not form on its own, culture is the collective mindset of individuals existing, working and growing together, but the knowing when to start over and change culture is to Hit Refresh.

My take from this one:
Technology is future, no doubt, but to be successful is to define success in terms of achieving what the vision at the onset.
People make the most important asset, and empathy goes a long way in successful people management.
Hit Refresh once in a while and start over again, you will get there eventually!!

P.S. Highly recommend this one to students and young adults stepping into their first jobs.

Comments

  1. Sounds interesting !!!! Would love to take some time out for this one.
    SKK

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  2. This sounds like a great read for my business colleagues and I, great review and thank you for sharing!

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  3. This sounds like an insightful read. Great review!

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  4. This sounds perfect for anyone trying to further their business career. Great review!

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  5. Not something I would read, but interesting to hear your thoughts

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  6. What an interesting book. I bet there are a lot of take aways. Have you read any about Steve Jobs? It would be interesting to read these two books simultaneously to see how they compare.

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  7. This one sounds like a must-read for anyone trying to break into the job world. Even people coming back after a long break.

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  8. Not my kind of read but great review :)

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